Finding funding for community-based research

Here are a list of possible sources of funding for HIV/AIDS related community-based research. For tips on applying for funding click here.

 

The CIHR HIV/AIDS Community-Based Research (CBR) Program assists community-based organizations, non-governmental organizations and institutions in developing the knowledge necessary to carry out their HIV/AIDS work in the most effective manner, and in creating expertise within these communities to conduct their own research. There are several funding opportunities available each year, which are always posted on their website.

 

The Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC) is the federal agency that promotes and supports post-secondary research and training in the humanities and social sciences. Their Insight program aims to support and foster excellence in social sciences and humanities research intended to deepen, widen and increase our collective understanding of individuals and societies, as well as to inform the search for solutions to societal challenges. Find out more information about this program on their website.

 

The Canadian Foundation for AIDS Research (CANFAR) is Canada’s only independent charitable foundation dedicated to ending AIDS through research. Grants are awarded on an annual basis. View research funding opportunities here.

 

Vancouver Foundation: Health & Medical Education/Research. The Vancouver Foundation support grants that support initiatives that ensure British Columbians are involved in advancing the health equity of their own communities. These research grants allow researchers and non-profit organizations to undertake relevant research collaboratively at the community level. Grantees first submit a letter of intent (Spring and Fall deadlines) and then a full application, upon invitation. For more information visit their website.

 

The Michael Smith Foundation for Health Research (MSFHR), funded by the government of British Columbia, is our province’s health research support agency. MSFHR’s mandate is to strengthen BC’s health research enterprise – which in turn improves the health of British Columbians, their health system and their economy. For current funding opportunities visit their website.

 

The ​Aboriginal HIV and AIDS Community-Based Research Collaborative Centre (AHA Centre) has launched a new Research Proposal Development Program. The purpose of the program is to assist Aboriginal communities, Aboriginal AIDS service organizations, and Aboriginal students interested in carrying out a research project, but who do not have the resources (human and/or financial) to prepare a proposal. The proposal that is crafted using AHA Centre funds should be submitted by the community/group or student to another research funding organization for consideration. You can find more information and applications forms on PAN’s website.

 

Learning the ropes around funding applications for community-based research can be intimidating — PAN’s community-based research program is here to help! If you are a PAN member or part of BC’s HIV/AIDS community, please get in touch for assistance.